5 “Internetized” Idioms

New mediums mean that we need new ways to describe and talk about them. I take five common idioms related to communication and translate them for the Internet age: “spread like wildfire”; “put in a nutshell”; “be on the same wavelength”; “bite your tongue”; and “keep you posted”.

I take five common idioms related to communication and translate them for the Internet age.

Idiom: spread like wildfire
Meaning: news, information, or gossip is transmitted very quickly to many people
Translation: spread like Tila Tequila AND her sextape
Origin of new idiom: the Internet makes it easy for users to share all types of information, even leaked sex tapes, quickly and easily

Idiom: put in a nutshell
Meaning: summarize a big idea or story simply
Translation: keep it to 140 characters
Origin of new idiom: social networking tool Twitter limits user posts to 140-character tweets

Idiom: be on the same wavelength
Meaning: the goal is for two or more people to communicate and listen so that they understand each other
Translation: add emoticons to clarify
Origin: oftentimes, Internet users must add emoticons after statements to ensure that they are interpreted correctly

Idiom: bite your tongue
Meaning: you avoid saying something that’s probably best left unsaid
Translation: hold your tweet
Origin: in the no-rules world of Twitter, many users are tempted to tweet anything and everything; think twice before you do

Idiom: keep you posted
Meaning: to keep a person informed about a situation, provide updates
Translation: keep you Facebook posted
Origin: with Facebook, you can let all your friends know about updates and happenings in your life

(Photo by Kevin Tiqui)

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